Over 80 years of involvement with the community and farmers in East Griqualand and Transkei

In early 1924 a young man, called Denis Louis Byrne arrived in New Amalfi to erect a windmill for a Mr. Wallis. His mode of transport was the evening train from Pietermaritzburg, which arrived before sun up. He worked for a British Company called Stewarts and Lloyds who were involved in the importation supply and installation of windmills, power generation, and water supply for farmers traders and villages in South Africa.

Denis Byrne was a descendent of an 1820 Settler and the grand nephew of Joseph Byrne who brought out the Byrne Settlers who settled around Richmond in Kwa Zulu Natal. He grew up in Harrismith during the Afrikaner Revolution and the First World War. It was very difficult economically and his father who was a bricklayer by trade and had to walk or hitch rides on goods trains to find work in Pietermaritzburg. 

The equipment was delivered by goods train and transported to site by the farmers ox wagons. A windmill took approximately five days and then it was back to Pietermaritzburg for weekend. This work continued up to the outbreak of the Second World War. The mode of transport had progressed from a motorbike to Chevrolet Motor Cars that were traded in every year or when they reached 60 000 miles There were no tarred roads in those days and the vehicles took a beating. East Griqualand was off the beaten track and farming activity was mainly wool and the farmers lucky enough to have farms near to the railway line sent cream to Pietermaritzburg on the morning train. The transport of meat products was very difficult due to the lack of suitable refrigeration. Cattle had to be transported by train on the hoof to the abattoirs in the cities. The traders and the missions were the main customers for the products sold by Stewarts and Lloyds.

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Over 80 years of involvement with the community and farmers in East Griqualand and Transkei

In early 1924 a young man, called Denis Louis Byrne arrived in New Amalfi to erect a windmill for a Mr. Wallis. His mode of transport was the evening train from Pietermaritzburg, which arrived before sun up. He worked for a British Company called Stewarts and Lloyds who were involved in the importation supply and installation of windmills, power generation, and water supply for farmers traders and villages in South Africa.

Denis Byrne was a descendent of an 1820 Settler and the grand nephew of Joseph Byrne who brought out the Byrne Settlers who settled around Richmond in Kwa Zulu Natal. He grew up in Harrismith during the Afrikaner Revolution and the First World War. It was very difficult economically and his father who was a bricklayer by trade and had to walk or hitch rides on goods trains to find work in Pietermaritzburg. 

The equipment was delivered by goods train and transported to site by the farmers ox wagons. A windmill took approximately five days and then it was back to Pietermaritzburg for weekend. This work continued up to the outbreak of the Second World War. The mode of transport had progressed from a motorbike to Chevrolet Motor Cars that were traded in every year or when they reached 60 000 miles There were no tarred roads in those days and the vehicles took a beating. East Griqualand was off the beaten track and farming activity was mainly wool and the farmers lucky enough to have farms near to the railway line sent cream to Pietermaritzburg on the morning train. The transport of meat products was very difficult due to the lack of suitable refrigeration. Cattle had to be transported by train on the hoof to the abattoirs in the cities. The traders and the missions were the main customers for the products sold by Stewarts and Lloyds.

Read more